Persepolis

In 1970s Iran, Marjane ‘Marji’ Statrapi watches events through her young eyes and her idealistic family of a long dream being fulfilled of the hated Shah’s defeat in the Iranian Revolution of 1979. However as Marji grows up, she witnesses first hand how the new Iran, now ruled by Islamic fundamentalists, has become a repressive tyranny on its own. With Marji dangerously refusing to remain silent at this injustice, her parents send her abroad to Vienna to study for a better life. However, this change proves an equally difficult trial with the young woman finding herself in a different culture loaded with abrasive characters and profound disappointments that deeply trouble her. Even when she returns home, Marji finds that both she and homeland have changed too much and the young woman and her loving family must decide where she truly belongs. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Ava says: “I thought the movie was great even though it had curse words in it.  I liked the part when she is cooking, it looked really good.  I was convinced to  never go to Iran, it would scare me to death if I was going to jail for listening to music.  I would give it 3  1/2 stars.”

Payton says: “The movie Persepolis was very interesting.  It was very eye-opening to see what happened in Iran in the last 30 years.  However, if you take out the inappropriate scenes and words and leave the more informative content, it would be much more enjoyable.  I would give it 3 stars.”

Jack says: “Persepolis was a scarcely entertaining movie. It had good animation… but that was probably the only good part about it. First of all it was not a good story. It never seemed to have an ending, it just kept on saying that everything in her life was terrible . I know it’s very sad but who wants to keep hearing the same thing over and over and over again, I know I don’t. Another thing is that in the middle of the movie, Marji finds her boyfriend cheating on her. Really, I mean I don’t need to see two people making out in a bed, I mean come on.  The worst thing was the language, every 20 seconds someone would curse! My opinion is that the movie was terrible. I’d give it 1/2 a star. ”

Vanessa says: “Persepolis was an interesting film. I enjoyed the beauty and simplicity of the animation and the story.  Young Marji was irresistible; full of hope and dreams. Watching her family struggle to maintain a “normal life” amidst the insanity of war and oppression was powerful and heartbreaking.  Marji truly becomes a women without a country, searching for an identity and a place to belong.  I agree that the saucy language did not contribute to character development or help to advance the plot in any way; it seemed out of place and only detracted from the film.  Despite it’s flaws I think this is an important film because we hear a voice that has not been heard in America before.   This movie is in French with English subtitles. I give it 3 stars.

The McHugh Family film rating system is on a scale of 5 stars.

5 thoughts on “Persepolis

  1. Hi guys! Wow, you had a lot of different opinions. Out of your reviews I see that the movie had bad language and some inappropriate scenes but was interesting and informing. I can’t wait to hear more about the things you’re doing! -Shea

  2. This film sounds pretty interesting. Words are a way to express thoughts and feelings. When people are in bad situations, they often use “curse” words to express their feelings of frustration and helplessness. You also have to consider that the film is in French with English subtitles so the translation might not be perfect. If I say merde, one person might translate it as “shit” and another as “poo”. In the end, you want to hear what a person is trying to express regardless of the limitations of their vocabulary.

    ps. Jack, you crack me up 🙂

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